« The conservative case for combating climate change | Main | Speaking of bees »

June 17, 2007

Comments

JimPortlandOR

Yeah, there are some foreign policy implications, but probably derived from the military strategy/tactics problems: counterinsurgency actions rarely work because of the overwhelming force required and the ruthlessness that needs to be displayed.

A relatively small force, even one insurgent fighter/bee can create havoc with remote controlled bombs, mortars, etc. At any time the conventional warriors could win just buy wiping out all the bees. In Vietnam, this was called wiping out a village to save it. The US almost came to this on the Faluga attack, but the bees fled after a while to attack again another day.

The bee (a suicide or roadside bomber) has inordinate power because the other side knows the sting hurts and avoids the sting whenever possible - likely because they also know that other bees may join the attack at any moment, at at some point the fight or flight instinct is yelling flight. That is the insurgent's strength.

I've often wondered why more of the opponents of Imperial Roman legions didn't realize that a head/head fight with the legions was doomed (training, tactics, weapons, and morale (belief in invincibility) being Roman advantages). The Germans did destroy a legion or two fighting unconventionally in the forest as guerillas, but that victory didn't get replicated - but it did keep Rome on the west bank of the Rhine for a long time.

When you think of it, wars with armies lined up in battle order across a field, and marching in line towards each other is really stupid (Napoleon/Wellington; some famous US civil war battles, etc.). How did this persist for so long? Same thing with pre-WWII naval battles with their line of battle warships.

But then, the whole war thing is fairly stupid as well. Maybe the ancient Greeks understood this when at Troy each side chose one warrior to battle another with the overall outcome to be determined by the sole victor.

I nominate George Bush to fight hand/hand against whoever the Iraqi's nominate as their hero. And no Trojan horses allowed either. He can have Patreus and Gonzales as his seconds and aide-de-camps.

Brian

Apt!

Amanda

Mitigator Rules!
I can recommend a new “scrub” product called “Mitigator Sting & Bite Treatment”; to say that it is terrific is an understatement! It actually removes venom by exfoliating the top layer of skin, opening the pores and drawing out the toxins. I had instant relief from pain and itching and all traces of the sting disappeared within minutes. I found it on the web at www.Mitigator.net. I got a great deal on a bundled package called the Mitigator “Itch Kit”, it contains enough products for the whole year – over $50.00 of retail product for under $20.00 (enough for over 300 stings or bites) and it comes in a great looking pouch. The only thing that can create a problem is if you wait too long to apply it, it should be rubbed in vigorously within the first few minutes after the bite or sting – the longer you wait, the less effective it is. I’ve used it on bees, wasps, fire ants (no blisters even appeared), mosquitoes and chiggers. They say it works on jellyfish but I’m a long way from the ocean so I haven’t needed it for that problem. No smelly chemicals, works great and is even safe for kids (the scrubbing replaces scratching so – no secondary infections). I should make a commercial for them!

The comments to this entry are closed.